Vanity and shower enclosure for the OKC container home

The bathroom has been one of the slowest areas of the OKC container home to come together. It’s a very important room in any house, but it has a lot of moving parts, so to speak, and all of those parts need to match somewhat from a design standpoint, and they also need to meet code requirements to pass inspection.

Had I the whole thing to do again, I would have turned the entire layout of the bathroom 90 degrees counter-clockwise. The current layout created some tricky decisions with regard to meeting code, such as the clearance needed on other side of the toilet and the distance of the vanity from the shower curb. The placement of the drains is also less than ideal, but accommodations had to be made to allow space in the walls for the pocket doors to slide. That’s why the pipes run underneath the vanity instead of inside the walls.

Further, the placement of the sink drain is completely off, but that’s what happens when you’re making decisions on the fly with plumbers who’re in a hurry to make their holes and move on to the next job.

At any rate, it’s turning out to be a pretty sweet bathroom, I think, and everything works great. There’s still a bit of cosmetic work to do around the walls at the top of the shower tile (which you can’t see in the pics below), and I still need a mirror, which I think will be a medicine cabinet with built-in LEDs and its own independent switch.

Special shout out to BL3 plumbing. They’re fast, friendly and affordable, and I could not have completed the bathroom build without them. Also, another big thank you to Tom’s Custom Shower Doors.

container toilet
Installing the toilet was easy enough. It’s a Water Sense-rated dual-flush model, and actually the cheapest one at Home Depot at $88. It would’ve been nice to have a black toilet, but black ones are outrageously expensive.
container vanity
The vanity needed to be no deeper than 12″ to meet code requirements with regard to distance from the shower curb. So, I wound up using hanging cabinets mounted on this footer, which was simply a box made from 2x10s.

container vanity

Here’s Morgan Brown of HB Contractors cutting out a hole in the cabinet’s top to allow for the placement of the sink. We actually could’ve cut out a bigger section and avoided the guesswork, but we wanted to maintain the structural integrity of the cabinet as much as possible.

Here's a view of the cabinet unit I chose. I removed the doors for staining and to protect them while other work continued, such as painting the footer black.
Here’s a view of the cabinet unit I chose. I removed the doors for staining and to protect them while other work continued, such as painting the footer black.
container vanity
Here’s Morgan Brown of HB Contractors cutting out a hole in the cabinet’s top to allow for the placement of the sink. We actually could’ve cut out a bigger section and avoided the guesswork, but we wanted to maintain the structural integrity of the cabinet as much as possible.
okc container vanity
When I ordered the sink from Amazon, I also purchased the drain kit that other customers had bought. This turned out to be wise, as the plumber needed at least part of it to piece together the rest of the drain system.
okc container vanity
Next it was on to the sink/faucet for the vanity. The basin is only 9″ in diameter and was actually designed for use in a boat. The water from the faucet falls perfectly into the middle of the drain.
okc container vanity
The counter top I chose was a quartz remnant from Builder’s Warehouse. As with the kitchen counter top, you kinda have to go with the flow when it comes to the color of the remnant that fits, but I thought the white-on-white turned out pretty nice.
okc container vanity
After the cabinet doors were stained, the whole thing just kinda came together at once. I still need to paint the side of the cabinet black, add a small towel rack and install a mirror though…
okc container home shower enclosure
Here’s Tom’s son from Tom’s Custom Shower Doors in OKC installing the end panel of my shower enclosure.
okc container home shower enclosure
After about an hour, the whole thing was finished. Works perfectly, too.

Shower installation for the OKC container home

Although installing a shower enclosure in the OKC container home would not require licensed tradespeople for permitting purposes, it also wasn’t something that Morgan and I were 100% confident we would WANT to do ourselves (even though we definitely COULD have…).

I had been looking at this DIY tutorial for installing a concrete basin. The procedure seemed straightforward enough, but at the end of the day a shower is the kind of thing one NEEDS done right. If it leaks, the problems created over time would more than exceed any money saved from a DIY job. Like I recently read online somewhere, “How comes there’s always time to redo an incorrect job but never enough time to do it right the first time?”

Great point.

So, I opted to contact a guy recommended to me from the former plumber. Jeremiah Crim from Rising Sun Tile out of Stillwater stays busy, but he was able to quote me for the installation of a Schluter shower system. His expertise combined with the reputation of the Schluter product would (hopefully) give me the confidence in the shower that I need to rest easy that it will last and long time and won’t leak.

  
  
The Schulter sheets provide a waterproof barrier that removes the need for mortarboard for tile. It also has grid lines that aid in the placement of tile. There’s even a component specifically designed to create a cubby in the wall. Last, the system includes a special kind of dense foam that allows for the creation of structural features, in this case, the shower curb.

Tile work

Next came the tile work to cover the shower enclosure. I wanted the bathroom to be a real highlight of the interior, so I was going for wow factor with my selection of tile style (while maintaining my minimalist black-and-white color scheme as portrayed in the walls and trim).

For the tile, Morgan recommended a friend of his: Brian Adair. In addition to being a great tile man, Brian is also a musician in several locally active bands.